A Letter from Our Persecuted Brothers and Sisters in Christ…

Posted: May 1, 2007 in Bible Study, Biblical Topics, challenge, Christ, Christianity, evangelism, faith, Jesus, life, Me, misc, News, personal, Religion

The following is a letter from our brothers and sisters abroad who are persecuted for their faith. When I say persecuted I don’t mean that they are shunned at fancy liberal dinner parties, belittled by atheists for their views on evolution, or that they are teased about their faith by coworkers and friends. I mean these people are risking death for our (and their) Lord and savior. We owe them- at the very least- our attention and our respect. Please read what they have to say.

“A letter to the Global Church from The Protestant Church of Smyrna

Dear friends,

This past week has been filled with much sorrow. Many of you have heard by now of our devastating loss here in an event that took place in Malatya, a Turkish province 300 miles northeast of Antioch, the city where believers were first called Christians (Acts 11:26).

On Wednesday morning, April 18, 2007, 46 year old German and father of three Tilmann Geske prepared to go to his office, kissing his wife goodbye taking a moment to hug his son and give him the priceless memory, “Goodbye, son. I love you.”

Tilman rented an office space from Zirve Publishing where he was preparing notes for the new Turkish Study Bible. Zirve was also the location of the Malatya Evangelist Church office. A ministry of the church, Zirve prints and distributes Christian literature to Malatya and nearby cities in Eastern Turkey. In another area of town, 35 year old Pastor Necati Aydin, father of two, said goodbye to his wife, leaving for the office as well. They had a morning Bible Study and prayer meeting that some other believers in town would also be attending. Ugur Yuksel likewise made his way to the Bible study.

None of these three men knew that what awaited them at the Bible study was the ultimate testing and application of their faith, which would conclude with their entrance into glory to receive their crown of righteousness from Christ and honor from all the saints awaiting them in the Lord’s presence.

On the other side of town, a group of young men all under 20 years old put into place final arrangements for their ultimate act of faith, living out their love for Allah and hatred of infidels who they felt undermined Islam…” Read the rest here.

Advertisements
Comments
  1. mommyzabs says:

    wow. i’m amazed that some of our family (of God) go through these things. So drastically different than what we experience.

    I’m amazed by the statement “don’t pray for an end to the persecution, but for perserverence.”

    What a different perspective than I usually have… I need to think on that one awhile.

  2. wytammic says:

    When I say persecuted I don’t mean that they are shunned at fancy liberal dinner parties, belittled by atheists for their views on evolution, or that they are teased about their faith by coworkers and friends.

    Makes our complaints seem rather petty.

  3. Neil says:

    I think we should reflect on the persecuted church regularly. It inspires me and helps me to persevere through my own trials – which, as Tammi pointed out, pale in comparison to the real suffering these people endure for the faith.

  4. wytammic says:

    Agreed Neil. I guess this is the primary reason I am so passionate about politics and 2nd amendment rights. We have the power to keep our nation from becoming like others that have no religious freedom. I, personally, do not want to become complacent regarding this — because complacency never leads to anything good. (That I’m aware of)

  5. My prayers go out.

  6. “She said in one sentence what 1000 missionaries in 1000 years could never do.”

    And that is what it is all about…

    Thank you so much for this powerful and sobering post.

    Sherri

  7. fma7 says:

    scripure is somewhat meaningless after the recent church scandals in Canada: Religous leaders must
    stay away from our children. Multi-generational epidemics of sanctioned and church protected pedophilia proves religion and children should not mix

    Stay out of our bedrooms. Work on correcting your own dysfunctional sexual urges

  8. That last post seems a bit off point fma7.

  9. wytammic says:

    Scripture is never meaningless.

  10. fma7 says:

    yes it is somewhat off point, and i do believe that innocent lives are to be grieved. However, I felt the need to weigh the millions of aborigonal children’s lifes destroyed by christian leaders documented in the recent scandal here in Canada alongside the grieving Christians might be experiencing for their recently slain comrades. Christian leaders have refused to accept full accountability for the genocide docunented by Canadian Courts and so I see this as a Christian dilema involving CHRISTIANS

  11. fma7 says:

    scripture is meaningless to the 80,000 abused aborigonal survivors of christian residental schools. Scripture was the rope that tied their culture and the hammer that delivered their culture to be crused and its people sacrificed

  12. DM says:

    TT,
    I did go ahead and read the rest of the article from your link this morning. To be honest, it was on my heart a good part of the day.

  13. fma7 says:

    thanks for your sharing your feelings regarding this trauma

  14. Larry says:

    Religion of peace indeed? My prayers go out to their families and their mission. Thank you for posting this. It is good to be reminded.

    Larry

  15. Shane says:

    I am with you in prayer for those martyred in Turkey.

    As for the Canadian chruches, you are missinformed my friend. There are many Christian chruches and groups who are doing repentance and reconciliation on this issue. I have many First-Nation Christian friends and they are releasing forgiveness, the power of God’s love will not be voided by the fallen aspect of man.

    I am sorry that you are so offended. If this has touched you personally, I stand in the gap and repent to you for the attrocities done under the banner of the church.
    Blessings…

  16. fma7 says:

    Shane, I sense that your heart is in the right place,however,
    no i am not misinformed and i also have native friends .The information, testimonies, documentaries and eyewitnessed accounts are available for the public. Yes there has been some repentance but mostly after court battles.Expensive lawyers, destroyed documents,muzzeling decrees to silence witnesses and the gov’t financially kicking in to financially allow the churches to not go under does’t foster heartfelt repentance.
    People close to me have been destroyed by the behaviour of these churches and i am more than offended. I am outraged

  17. Any good sources for info on this fma7? I don’t mind if you post links, just don’t post more than two or the spam filter will filter out your post.

  18. Wow, Askimet still marked it as spam.

    No problem fma7. I am all about free speech and access to information.

  19. […]   It was on that day I heard the news of the brutal killing of three Turkish believers  as I read Total Transformations blog of the  day. https://totaltransformation.wordpress.com/2007/05/01/harvest-workers-needed/ […]

  20. Marie says:

    fma7, I can sense the anger and outrage in your messages. I too have cried for the natives people of this country and the atrocities done to them just as I have cried tears for the Jews killed under Hitler’s regime (even though I wasn’t born yet!). The bottom line is…humankind is in need of GOD. Injustice and atrocities are going to continue – sin of human nature is beyond our control, but one thing we know as Christians, is that Christ’s love and forgiveness must be in our hearts if we are going to wage any spiritual battles or wars (it all starts in the heart). Do you not think that God sheds a tear for everyone of his children that have their throats slit in his name or for those that are holding the knife?? He loves us all and longs for reconicilation…that is the root of Christianity!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s